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Video - The Story of Cholera: Haitian Creole

See video

Global Health Media Project - Yoni Goodman

This film makes visible the invisible cholera germs as a young boy shows how to help the sick and guides his village in preventing the spread of cholera.

For Mobile Phones:

To download The Story of Cholera (Haitian Creole narration) for mobile phones: Go to the Global Health Media Project website by CLICKING HERE.

High Resolution Flashcards - The Story of Cholera

submitted by Peter Cardellichio - October 2, 2012

The new high resolution flashcards (in Haitian Creole and English) are now on our website.  Just go to bottom of this page to download them:  

http://globalhealthmedia.org/story-of-cholera/videos/

Flashcards for The Story of Cholera - Haitian Creole

by Peter Cardellichio - globalhealthmedia.org - April 25, 2012

Teach to Transform (TTT) is teaching about waterborne illness in developing countries. The organization is using an iPad to show The Story of Cholera video in remote areas to teach people how diarrheal diseases are transmitted and what to do to prevent them.

TTT encourages sustainability so they want local people to be able to share the information and knowledge with other villagers. A volunteer of TTT developed a set of still pictures from our movie—about 50 in all—in flashcard format. The flashcards can be left with local leaders to “spread the word” without the need for equipment that can play the video.

These flashcards are now available for downloading from our website in English and Haitian Creole. We are preparing flashcards for other languages.

http://globalhealthmedia.org/2012/04/25/flashcards-for-the-story-of-cholera/

Hurricane Sandy: The Psychological Aftermath

When a sudden, unanticipated catastrophe lands on your doorstep, there’s before and there’s after.

One day life is going on as it always has. The next day life deals you such a blow that nothing will ever be the same.

http://psychcentral.com/blog/archives/2012/11/20/hurricane-sandy-the-psychological-aftermath/

Liliana

et al.Foundation

Haiti-Huricane Sandy Aftermath 10/26/12

..."

 I would say the bridge is AT LEAST 40 feet above the river bed. Since it was merely drizzling at this point, I had no idea of the conditions around us.
It rained through the night and we woke to more rain. We soon learned that there had been significant flooding, which had already taken the lives of 11 people, with many more anticipated deaths. One of the employees here is in his 30’s and he said he has never witnessed this much rain and flooding....
http://impactforjesus.blogspot.co.nz/2012/10/haiti-huricane-sandy-aftermath-102612.html

Liliana

et al.Foundation